Public Programs

NCA organizes and participates in a number of programs that serve to disseminate relevant information about communication to public audiences.   

 
(What Does it Mean to Be a Citizens in Contemporary America? was held at Busboys and Poets in Washington, DC, on March 22, 2016.)
 

Past Public Programs  
 
March 22, 2016
Washington, DC 
   What Does it Mean to Be a Citizen in Contemporary in America?

Interactive conversation about what it means to be a citizen of the United States in the 21st Century. This frank and stimulating discussion was led by a panel of distinguished teachers and scholars who have thought long and hard about the meaning and power of American “citizenship.”

October 19-25, 2015
National Event
  Free Speech Week, NCA Participation (annual)

Each year, NCA co-sponsors Free Speech Week in support of its credo affirming the value of free expression in a democratic society. NCA also encourages members to discuss issues related to freedom of speech in their classrooms and communities.

October 20-26,  2014
National event
  Free Speech Week, NCA Participation (annual)

Each year, NCA co-sponsors Free Speech Week in support of its credo affirming the value of free expression in a democratic society. NCA also encourages members to discuss issues related to freedom of speech in their classrooms and communities.

March 20, 2014
Boston, MA
  Clarifying Conversations: Representations of Race and Identity in Contemporary American Culture, a public program of NCA
Responding to ongoing public discussions about race and identity, this panel provided interactive dialogue about how race and identity are represented, articulated, constituted, and enacted in various ways in American culture, from political discussions to popular culture, in the news media and among citizens in everyday conversation. Clarifying Conversations was held at Emerson College in Boston, MA.
October 2013
Albuquerque, NM
 

Association for Science and Technology Centers Annual Conference
This program, featuring Communication scholars, addressed critical questions facing science museums as they attempt higher levels of public engagement and civic deliberations about science and public policy.

July 2013
Washington, DC
 

Media, Memory, and the March on Washington: How We Teach and What We Learn about the Speech that Changed America, an NCA partnership with the Newseum Institute
On the 50th of the “I Have a Dream” speech, this panel of Communication scholars and journalists addressed how the speech and march have been portrayed, represented, and understood in the media by journalists and in popular culture. Watch the video

October 2012
Richmond, VA
  Unlike Any Other Presidential Debate in History: Reflections on the 20th Anniversary of the 1992 Richmond Town Hall Debate, a partnership with the Department of Rhetoric and Communication Studies at the University of Richmond

In 1992, the University of Richmond hosted the first presidential town hall debate.  Just two days after President Obama and Governor Romney engaged in their own 2012 town hall debate, Communication scholars, political and media experts, and an audience gathered to discuss what made the 1992 debate so influential.  Watch the video

October 2012
Washington, DC
  Beyond Wins and Losses: A Citizen’s Guide to the 2012 Presidential Debates, a partnership with the First Amendment Center at the Newseum

This interactive discussion featured Communication scholars and journalists going beyond the wins and losses, beyond the snap judgments and easy answers, and offering a citizen’s guide for watching and processing the hours of debating between Governor Romney and President Obama.  Watch the recorded C-SPAN coverage

     

Member/Colleague Public Programs