Volume 11, Issue 3 - June 2016Print | Email

The Computerized Automation of Speaking and Writing

Vol 11-3 F 1 MAIN 

Imagine reading an automated news story that was composed entirely by a computer. (It’s likely that you already have.) Or imagine yourself sitting on a couch, conversing with an artificially intelligent psychotherapist who interacts with you from a screen across the room.  


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Cross Current

Managing Transgender Identity Online

Vol 11-3 CC 1-1

When André Cavalcante of the University of Virginia took a graduate school seminar about transgender identity, life, and politics, his curiosity about the role that technology played in the everyday lives of transgendered people began to grow.


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Instructor’s Corner: Can Mobile Devices Encourage Positive Communicative Behaviors in the Classroom?

Vol 11-3 CC3 1

Mobile devices have drastically changed the way people communicate in recent years. Multicommunication—such as tweeting while talking to friend —is commonplace. 


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Instructor’s Corner: Disaster Day! An Impromptu Group Speech Activity

Vol 11-3 CC4 1

Douglas E. Pruim of Purdue University has led his Disaster Day activity with more than 20 classes over the past 10 years in different educational contexts (small liberal arts college, community college, and major research university).


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Social Media and the U.S. Coast Guard: A Case Study

Vol 11-3 CC 2 2

Government agencies are increasingly using social media as an important part of their public affairs plans to engage with citizens, disseminate information, and deliver services more effectively.


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Are People More Easily Persuaded by Those Whose Faces Resemble Their Own?

Vol 11-3 T 1 1

To Adam Richards of Texas Christian University, it seemed natural to study the synthesis between the source characteristics that are known to affect persuasion and the characteristics that appear to be related to evolutionary success. A source’s similarity to message recipients has been shown to have a strong effect on a persuasive message’s influence.  


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An-Arche: Indigenous Ways of Structuring Authority in a Rarámuri Community

VOL 11-3 T2 3

On the balmy summer night of her research team’s arrival to a small rural Rarámuri community in Ciudad del Urique in northwestern Mexico, S. Lily Mendoza, then an ethnographer-in-training, had the chance to attend a political rally in the village’s municipal plaza. In the crowd were men in their long-sleeved white shirts, khaki pants, and white buri hats standing off to one side, while women and youth sat on benches along the plaza’s periphery, listening or chatting.


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Home Page | The Computerized Automation of Speaking and Writing | Managing Transgender Identity Online | Instructor’s Corner: Can Mobile Devices Encourage Positive Communicative Behaviors in the Classroom? | Instructor’s Corner: Disaster Day! An Impromptu Group Speech Activity | Social Media and the U.S. Coast Guard: A Case Study | Are People More Easily Persuaded by Those Whose Faces Resemble Their Own? | An-Arche: Indigenous Ways of Structuring Authority in a Rarámuri Community 
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