Volume 10, Issue 6 - December 2015Print | Email

What Happens When a Politician’s Images Circulate in the Media?

Vol 10-6 F alpha 

Imagine a politician’s life. You’ve just given a carefully constructed speech on a new policy, but newspaper coverage only focuses on your new haircut. You hop onto the Internet and find that there are multiple people who have started Twitter accounts on your behalf. Or, like most humans, sometimes you simply flub what you’d meant to say, as in Vice President Joe Biden’s assertion, “If we do everything right, if we do it with absolute certainty, there’s still a 30 percent chance we’re going to get it wrong.” These examples highlight some pressures that all politicians now face, as the speed and reach of new technologies multiply the potential for different perceptions about a person to circulate in public.


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Cross Current

Investing in Collaborative Technology to Improve Communication? Proceed with Caution.

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Organizations are investing heavily in collaborative technology, but the reality is that new forms of collaborative technology are not necessary for every organization, or for every team. In part, the impact of collaborative technology depends on how much an organization relies on virtual work arrangements.


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How Facebook Helps (or Doesn’t Help) Newcomers Adapt

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Since its foundation in 2004, Facebook has become a symbol of social networking and facilitated worldwide communication. Other online services such as YouTube, Twitter, and Instagram have become integrated into our daily lives. These platforms connect us as never before and allow us to be in touch instantly and around the clock.


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Will This Be on the #Test?

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As social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter become more prevalent, we see a blurring of lines between what college professors tweet about for social purposes and what they post for their academic audience (think: students and colleagues). Because of this, we became interested in how students interpret professors’ credibility when they use Twitter as a mode of public communication. Our study examines how the Twitter messages a professor posts could be sending the right—and wrong—signals to student Twitter followers.


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“Accomplishing Work with Classmates I Never See”: Meaningful Online Collaboration for the 21st Century

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Many young adults are savvy when it comes to using technology to communicate with those in their social networks. However, as they enter professional jobs, they will likely be called upon to use technology much differently to interact with coworkers on work-related tasks. An estimated 1.3 billion employees worldwide are working virtually.


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Don’t Talk Yourself into an Early Grave! The Role of Communication in Aging Well

Vol 10-6 T 1 2Growing older is something all of us go through—some with more enthusiasm than others! While we cannot avoid aging, we do have control over how we experience it, and this starts with the way we talk about it. Our research focuses on how we can proactively manage our futures through communication. In other words, how we can talk ourselves into (or out of) social worlds that promote successful aging.
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Seeking Social Support in the Information Age: What Types of Support Messages Do People Coping with Illness Receive Online?

Vol 10-6 T 2 1Illness presents a variety of challenges. In addition to receiving traditional forms of care, millions of adult Americans turn to the Internet as part of their coping efforts. Online communities such as those found on WebMD, social networking websites such as Facebook, and even blogs are used to connect with others who are facing similar challenges and acquire social support.
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Offering HIV Screening Where At-risk Individuals Live: Challenges and Opportunities

Vol 10-6 T 3 1Public health strategies to prevent AIDS focus on identifying HIV-infected people, getting them into treatment, and communicating with them about ways to prevent the spread of the virus. Previous efforts have sought to reach at-risk individuals where they hang out, such as bars, homeless shelters, and community clinics.
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Wearing Their Grandparents’ Tattoos: A New Generation Remembers the Holocaust

Vol 10-6 T 4 1A number tattoo on the left forearm is a familiar symbol of the Nazi Holocaust. On the body of a Jewish Holocaust survivor, the tattoo communicates the fact that the wearer survived the brutality and lived to tell the story. What meanings are communicated about the Holocaust, however, when younger generations of Jewish people tattoo their ancestors’ Auschwitz numbers on their own bodies?
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The Writing on the Wall: (New) Racism in U.S. Public Conversations about Race

Vol 10-6 T 5 2In everyday talk when individuals are accused of “playing the race card" it is often seen as an underhanded effort to give those who (can) use it an unfair advantage, closing down conversations about race.
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Home Page | What Happens When a Politician’s Images Circulate in the Media? | Investing in Collaborative Technology to Improve Communication? Proceed with Caution.  | How Facebook Helps (or Doesn’t Help) Newcomers Adapt | Will This Be on the #Test? | “Accomplishing Work with Classmates I Never See”: Meaningful Online Collaboration for the 21st Century | Don’t Talk Yourself into an Early Grave! The Role of Communication in Aging Well | Seeking Social Support in the Information Age: What Types of Support Messages Do People Coping with Illness Receive Online? | Offering HIV Screening Where At-risk Individuals Live: Challenges and Opportunities | Wearing Their Grandparents’ Tattoos: A New Generation Remembers the Holocaust | The Writing on the Wall: (New) Racism in U.S. Public Conversations about Race 
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