Volume 9, Issue 2 - April 2014Print | Email

The “Other Media” of Occupy

Feigenbaum_image_1Creativity is one of the most distinct features of protest camps like Occupy Wall Street. Different from marches, strikes, or demos, occupations and encampments are unique in that they are place-based sites where people both protest and live together. In our book, Protest Camps, we argue these sites offer protesters a place to come together and share knowledge and experiences. These camps often become imaginative laboratories for experimenting with media, communication technologies, and protest tactics.

Media and communication innovations were everywhere in Occupy camps. They came in digital, analog, and mixed forms. From the well-documented practice of the “people’s mic” to Occuprint’s street-side printing presses to the live streaming of general assemblies, Occupy encampments became a space for experimenting with new forms of and for communication. Whether making pizza box placards or wearable tents, people found creative ways to get their messages across. In doing so, they engaged with all kinds of objects that populate protest camp sites. In this piece, I look beyond taken-for-granted media devices to examine two of these “other media” objects—tents and tear gas—to find out what they might have to tell us about media and communication in the Occupy movement.


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Cross Current

Instructor's Corner #1: Caring Teacher Communication Makes College Transition Easier

Wang_image_3Effective teachers work to develop meaningful relationships with their students. These relationships often begin as pedagogical associations. Over time, as teachers engage in empathic caring communication with their students, these associations can develop into something more: interpersonal relationships. Supportive relationships are especially important as students make the transition from high school to college. This transition can be particularly challenging for the 30 percent of entering freshmen who will be the first in their family to complete college. 
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Instructor's Corner #2: To Engage Students, You Must Positively Engage WITH Students

Communication between instructors and students is an inherent part of any classroom interaction. Further, communication and participation by students is an inherent part of the learning process.Frisby_image_2 Because of this, student participation in the classroom has prompted national surveys (e.g., National Survey on Student Engagement), headlines in the popular press, and student and instructor complaints when participation is lacking, as well as a closer examination of instructor-student interactions as interpersonal relationships.
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Instructor's Corner #3: Engaging Students in “Big Picture” Ethics

Canary_image_1Numerous professional societies have codes of ethics or conduct that describe ethical considerations of those professions, including the professions’ relationships to and within society. Communication is an integral part of preparing students to be ethical members of these professions and of society. Communication is an integral part of preparing students to be ethical members of these professions and of society. We used the engaged communication in the disciplines (E-CID) approach to study ethics education as a communication process for science and engineering students.
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Instructor's Corner #4: Snap Shots: Using Photography for Intercultural Awareness and Understanding

Watching images through mass media presents a challenge for understanding the complexities of different cultures within and outside the United States. Photographic images, in particular, are ubiquitous in ourAlvaray_image_3 mediated world, populating old and interactive media. Many times, they serve to perpetuate established codes of understanding and action. The power of photography lies not only in its emotional force, but also in its capacity to claim authenticity while representing the world. In other words, photography often is deemed a holder of unquestionable truths—even though interpretation depends upon the social and cultural frameworks of the beholder’s knowledge.
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COMM 365: Celebrating 100 Years of Communication Research through 2014

NCA_centennialIn honor of its upcoming Centennial, the National Communication Association is sponsoring COMM 365, a project celebrating 100 years of communication research. Five times per week, brief summaries of communication concepts, theories, and research findings are being posted on NCA’s website. Click here to see the most recent postings, which could be of interest to communication practitioners, teachers, and many others. The leader of the project is Zac Gershberg, Ph.D., who makes his intellectual home at the University of California at Stanislaus in Turlock, CA, USA.
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Career Messages and Adolescents’ Framing: The Effect on Interest in STEM Careers

JahnMyers_image_1Career-related communication and experiences before and during adolescence have the potential to affect students’ academic and career-path choices in high school, college, and long-term career trajectories. As adolescents receive messages and are exposed to various situations, they interpret and evaluate the information based on their career frameworks--sets of assumptions and values that filter and affect how individuals act, react, and learn.
 
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Are Videos for Health Websites Worth Creating?

Perrault_image_3Videos promoting healthy behaviors seem to be all over the Web. While today almost anyone with a smart phone has the ability to shoot videos, creating high-quality, professional looking videos still takes significant time, energy, and resources.
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Consequences of Miscommunicating Revised Breast Cancer Screening Guidelines

In 2009, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) caused controversy when it suggested significant revisions to breast cancer screening guidelines. It advised women to initiate obtaining mammograms atVardeman_image_1 age 50 rather than 40 and to seek mammograms every two years rather than annually.
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Is Family Based on Biology or Action? Dueling Meanings of Family at Play in the U.S. Foster Care System

Suter_image_1Although recent legislative changes have intended to expedite adoptions, the typical foster child in the United States waits four years to be adopted.
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Locating Whiteness in Journalism Pedagogy

Scholars who research issues of diversity in journalism education advocate an additive approach: integrate multicultural material into existing curricula, or recruit students or faculty of color.Aleman_image_1 
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Home Page | The “Other Media” of Occupy | Instructor's Corner #1: Caring Teacher Communication Makes College Transition Easier | Instructor's Corner #2: To Engage Students, You Must Positively Engage WITH Students | Instructor's Corner #3: Engaging Students in “Big Picture” Ethics | Instructor's Corner #4: Snap Shots: Using Photography for Intercultural Awareness and Understanding | COMM 365: Celebrating 100 Years of Communication Research through 2014 | Career Messages and Adolescents’ Framing: The Effect on Interest in STEM Careers | Are Videos for Health Websites Worth Creating? | Consequences of Miscommunicating Revised Breast Cancer Screening Guidelines | Is Family Based on Biology or Action? Dueling Meanings of Family at Play in the U.S. Foster Care System | Locating Whiteness in Journalism Pedagogy 
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