Volume 9, Issue 4 - August 2014Print | Email

Strength in Weakness: Pseudo-Patriotism Surrounds the Ground Zero Mosque Dispute

Pierce_image_1In late 2009, the media registered encouragement for the grand plans to renovate Cordoba House, an Islamic community center in Lower Manhattan with an interfaith mission. Yet, just six months later, a public maelstrom erupted over the so-called “Ground Zero Mosque,” as the majority of Americans from across the political spectrum—including President Obama—called for the center’s relocation in the name of common decency. The communication frenzy surrounding Cordoba House marked the onset of a new, post-post 9/11 American narrative that tells of a country traumatized, under siege, and unable to extend constitutionally guaranteed freedoms for fear of being hurt again.

After 9/11, Americans enjoyed an unprecedented sense of patriotism that continued to grow during the early years of the war on terror as the Bush administration spun an inspiring national narrative of democratic destiny. However, the war’s demoralizing failures left Americans disillusioned and anxious. The Cordoba House mission exacerbated this anxiety, reminding Americans of their shirked responsibilities in Iraq and Afghanistan.



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Cross Current

Instructor's Corner #1: Using Communication to Make Students Feel Better About Their Coursework

Goldman_image_1When students enter the college classroom, they bring a host of expectations. Many of today’s college students, composed largely of the millennial generation, expect their instructors to help them understand course material, recognize their achievements and high-quality work, and care about their success and learning in the course.


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Instructor's Corner #2: Empowering Students by Paying It Forward

What if a speech could empower students to make a difference in the community? We believe the act of paying it forward empowers students to feel more confident in their communication skills and acts as catalyst to create positive changes in theMcKenna-Buchanan_image_1 community. We believe the act of paying it forward empowers students to feel more confident in their communication skills and acts as catalyst to create positive changes in the community.


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Instructor's Corner #3: All I Really Need to Know I Learned from Hip-Hop: Hip Hop’s Role in Teaching Communication Skills

Scuillo_image_1My argument is that hip-hop music is an increasingly effective tool for teaching communication. This is because many of today’s undergraduate and graduate students, as well as new professors in rhetoric, communication, and media studies grew up listening to hip-hop. Hip-hop music conveys myriad messages about love, life, law, ethics, and politics. Music has long played a central role in our lives, from the first album we bought with our own money to our prom songs, wedding songs, and the like.


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Celebrate 100 Years of the NCA!

NCA_centennialThe National Communication Association (NCA) invites Communication departments and programs across the country to honor the NCA Centennial with activities geared toward celebrating the association and discipline. Join the celebration! Here is how you can get involved.

1)      Plan and implement a departmental celebration. Use NCA’s 100th anniversary to celebrate your own program and people. Perhaps you could design a way to celebrate your own pioneers. You could research your history and disseminate your legacy. You also might organize some of the digital memories associated with your program and share them with NCA. At your celebration, consider asking people to share what the study of Communication at your institution means to them.

2)      Document the centennial celebration on your website. When you implement your celebration, document it on your website to share with others, including your current students, administration, and alumni. In your documented celebration images, you might include video clips and text that afford members of the association insight into your program, people, and what 100 years of NCA and the discipline mean to your department.

3)      Share your celebration with NCA. Prior to NCA’s Annual Convention in November, highlight your centennial celebration by sending your URL website link to the NCA National Office (wfernando@natcom.org). Throughout the centennial year, NCA’s website will feature select celebrations from across the nation.

Don’t miss this exciting opportunity to highlight your program and people and join in this national celebration of 100 years of NCA! For more information about this centennial celebration activity, contact Jeffrey T. Child at Kent State University (jchild@kent.edu).


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I REMEMBER…. NCA Centennial Video

The 2014 Annual Convention of the National Communication Association (NCA) will mark the association’s Centennial, its 100-year anniversary.  While this is a momentous occasion, members of NCA gather, create and take away memories of events,Turner_image_1 individuals and presentations every year.  At the 2013 Annual Convention students from Wrought Iron Productions (WIP) and Wake Forest University captured individual’s memories of their experiences at NCA conventions.  This 32-minute video documents the value of NCA to its members and the field of communication.

The video is now live on the NCA Centennial page.  Please feel free to share this link on your departmental websites.


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COMM 365: Celebrating 100 Years of Communication Research through 2014

/uploadedImages/CommunicationCurrents_Articles/Volume_9/NCA_centennial.jpgIn honor of its upcoming Centennial, the National Communication Association is sponsoring COMM 365, a project celebrating 100 years of communication research. Five times per week, brief summaries of communication concepts, theories, and research findings are being posted on NCA’s website. Click here to see the most recent postings, which could be of interest to communication practitioners, teachers, and many others. The leader of the project is Zac Gershberg, Ph.D., who now makes his intellectual home at Idaho State University in Pocatello, ID, USA.

 


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The Hunger Games: Heroic Whiteness and Femininity

The 2012 filmThe Hunger Games is the adaptation of the first book of Suzanne Collins’s best-selling trilogy about a post-apocalyptic world and its 16-year-old white hero, Katniss Everdeen.Ryalls_image_1 The filmis set in the fictional "Panem,” where the government forces its citizens to participate in “the Hunger Games,” a televised competition in which children battle to the death.
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What Women Want: Supportive Communication among Women Coping with Infertility

 /uploadedImages/CommunicationCurrents_Articles/Volume_9/High_image_1.jpgInfertility is a significant stressor faced by approximately 15 percent of couples, and people facing infertility encounter medical concerns, psychological consequences, and uncertainty about their relationships.
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Kind of Blue: Re/playing Memories and Stories through Music

Has listening to certain music ever taken you back to a particular place, time, and a flood of memories?Shoemaker_image_1 Performance studies scholars claim that music works on us; it materially moves us into new places of possibility over years of listening, singing, playing, and dancing along.
 
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Making Complex Industrial Systems Safe Means Solving Unsolvable Communication Dilemmas

Barbour_image_1Keeping industrial systems safe requires the navigation of technology and human communication and sensemaking.
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World Café Process Transforms Science Center Community into Co-designers

How might we understand the needs of a science center’s many diverse communities in designing an innovative learning space?Thompson_image_1 How might we design a collaborative communication process to design a physical space in a science center (or anywhere, for that matter)?
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Intra-European Union Migration: More Rights for Migrant EU Citizens?

Drzewiecka_image_1When Malta and Cyprus were admitted into the European Union (EU) as new member states from Centraland Eastern Europe in 2004, their citizens gained rights to freedom of movement and employment in the EU states.
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Home Page | Strength in Weakness: Pseudo-Patriotism Surrounds the Ground Zero Mosque Dispute | Instructor's Corner #1: Using Communication to Make Students Feel Better About Their Coursework | Instructor's Corner #2: Empowering Students by Paying It Forward | Instructor's Corner #3: All I Really Need to Know I Learned from Hip-Hop: Hip Hop’s Role in Teaching Communication Skills | Celebrate 100 Years of the NCA! | I REMEMBER…. NCA Centennial Video | COMM 365: Celebrating 100 Years of Communication Research through 2014 | The Hunger Games: Heroic Whiteness and Femininity | What Women Want: Supportive Communication among Women Coping with Infertility | Kind of Blue: Re/playing Memories and Stories through Music | Making Complex Industrial Systems Safe Means Solving Unsolvable Communication Dilemmas | World Café Process Transforms Science Center Community into Co-designers | Intra-European Union Migration: More Rights for Migrant EU Citizens? 
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